We want to be a bridgehead, but the conflicts of the great powers strengthen buffer zones

It’s a long-time ambition of the Central Eastern European region to be a serve as a kind of bridgehead between the East and the West. But history hasn’t shown any examples so far, when this role really materialised or stabilised in the long term. Continue reading “We want to be a bridgehead, but the conflicts of the great powers strengthen buffer zones”

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“We are not worse than Western people”

The representatives of eight Eastern Central European countries, Hungary, Croatia, Poland, Slovakia, Romania, Bulgaria, Latvia and Estonia launched a citizens’ initiative for a European wage union at the conference held in Budapest’s Hotel Kempinski on Tuesday. As a signatory of the declaration, Mihail Petrov, the president of Bulgaria’s VMRO BND Youth Platform told us that Eastern Central European people were not second-class citizens of the European Union and they deserved better living conditions. Continue reading ““We are not worse than Western people””

European Wage Union: Eastern Central Europe asks for fair treatment and equality

With representatives coming from eight Eastern Central European countries, i.e., Hungary, Croatia, Poland, Slovakia, Romania, Bulgaria, Latvia and Estonia, a European citizens’ initiative has been launched to achieve a European Wage Union. The declaration to that effect was adopted and signed in Hotel Kempinski, Budapest. Continue reading “European Wage Union: Eastern Central Europe asks for fair treatment and equality”

Jobbik for Hungary

Scare-mongering marches, stomping boots, uniforms, neo-Nazi symbols, antisemitism. This is the image circulating in the Western press of the Jobbik for Hungary Movement (in short: Jobbik), and because of this, many believe it to be some far-right hoofed devil. It has been the political interest of the Hungarian left-liberal circles and now also of the current government to portray Jobbik as a dangerous far-right party. But the reality is that Jobbik is the strongest opposition party, and the second strongest party in Hungary. This doesn’t mean though that far-right ideologies are gaining in strength in Hungary. The Orbán government, which has been in power since 2010, perfected the corruption mechanism of the left-socialist governments, centralising power with a clique of party cadres. The Jobbik for Hungary Movement has become the government-replacing alternative which could take the place of this new elite. Continue reading “Jobbik for Hungary”